Cats

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Welcome Our New Weekend & Evening Groomer

Please join us in welcoming a new member of the Craig Road team: our new groomer Rebecca!

rebecca, groomer

Rebecca Stuessy

Her addition to Craig Road means that we will now be offering grooming during the evenings and on weekends.

Rebecca has multiple years of experience grooming dogs & cats of all sizes and understands how to discern the specific grooming needs of each pet.

We are currently accepting appointments for Rebecca for this week and over the weekend. Rebecca will be working alongside Becky who has been grooming at Craig Road since 1996. This now means that we will have significantly more availability for grooming. It also allows us to offer grooming during the day, seven days a week, and on select evenings.

Please note that Rabies, Distemper, Parvo, and Bordetella vaccines as well as intestinal parasite testing are required to be up to date for all pets brought in for grooming.

Welcome Rebecca!

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Aug 15, 2016 0 1196 Views

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They call him Dr. Google

Tiffany Major, DVM

By Tiffany Major, DVM

We’ve all done it. Whenever we start to feel like we are coming down with something, we type out a list of our symptoms and send them over to “Dr. Google”. While some find answers, others have scared themselves into believing that what they thought was the flu is now full-blown Ebola.

Most doctors feel that googling treatments isn’t the best idea, and we agree. When it comes to diagnosing your pet, I only have this to say: the internet is no easy answer. As humans, we have the gift of speech. We are able to communicate with others to let them know when we don’t feel right. And when we are getting worse.

Your pet on the other hand cannot always let you know what is wrong, and sometimes, the symptoms only show when it is too late. Annual check-ups are strongly recommended and one of the most important factors in preventative care. But too often I see emergencies where a pet is brought in with an exacerbated condition because their owner decided to treat them with a Dr. Google prescription.

Not everything on the internet is bad. While some “Ask a Vet” websites could be useful when asking non-emergency questions such as “can I give my dog turkey on Thanksgiving?” or “what’s the easiest way to crate train?” These are non-threatening questions and don’t need emergency medical care.

And there are many websites that provide useful information for our pets to live long, happy lives including ours. I cannot speak for all websites, but I know that craigrd.com is here to help you identify signs that you may need to seek medical help from a professional. Our website is here so that you have information on what to do in the first few minutes of an emergency until you can get to a professional, and information online so that you know when you need a professional.

Performing a routine check up.

But when your pet is experiencing rapid weight loss, vomiting, pale gums, coughing, having diarrhea or anything along those lines, please get professional help.

We would never diagnose anything over the phone or through our website because just like humans, all animals are different. The only way to know what is wrong is to bring in your pet to get checked out. Just like many other states, Nevada law says it is illegal for a veterinarian to diagnose, treat, or prescribe anything to a pet if they haven’t completed a physical exam on them within the past 12 months or if they have a new condition.

Common problems I run into when owners’ google signs and symptoms on their own are misdiagnosis, giving their pet the wrong treatment and even death. One client came in with a very sick dog and told me that they read on the internet that you can give your dog any human medication. No, you can’t. As a result, they gave their dog human pain medication and poisoned a four-legged family member. By the time we saw her, she was near death.

While there are human medications safe for your pet, it is always best to check with a professional prior to giving to ensure it is okay to give, and the proper dosage to give.

A 10 to 20 pound dog cannot take the same dosage as a 60 pound dog or a 200 pound human being. Furthermore, human medications can be poisonous for your pet if given at an improper dose – just like some foods are.  

We love our pets and never want them to be in any kind of pain, but one of the reasons why Dr. Google is no good is because it is purely information without any context.  Veterinarians have over eight years of schooling plus years of experience in the field. We call it “practice” because we practice veterinary medicine throughout our careers.

If you ever feel that something is wrong with your pet, please don’t wait. Come see us, our job is to give the best care possible so that your loved one can get back to their normal selves.

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Sep 23, 2015 0 1739 Views

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Craig Road Animal Hospital Externship Program: Elizabeth Ashman

Elizabeth Ashman

Hailing from Oak Ridge, New Jersey, Elizabeth Ashman was introduced to us through our externship program here at Craig Road Animal Hospital. The fourth year student will become a D.V.M. after graduating from Ross University in September 2015.

Concentrating on general practice and internal medicine, Ashman said that working in the field is one of her true passions and finds it to be extremely rewarding. She loves working on all animals and has even worked with big cats like snow leopards and lions at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York.

Ashman also understands how animals can be a very important member of a family. “It’s nice to not only make a difference to the animal itself but also to the clients,” Ashman said.

While she is excited to be reunited with her three dogs back in Jersey, the veterinary student plans to practice in the Midwest and cannot wait to get started.

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Jul 17, 2015 0 1529 Views

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Helping a Long Time Client – Dogs and Cats for Adoption!

Due to an unforeseeable set of circumstances, one of our long time clients is unable to keep their two dogs and three cats and asked Craig Road Animal Hospital if we could help.
All five pets are currently boarding with us and have been patients for all of their lives.

If you are interested in meeting any of these pets, with a view to adopting one of them, please call our office to set up an appointment.

Cleo is a 5 year old spayed female Pit Bull. Very sweet and full of energy, Cleo is a great fun dog.

 

Puppy is a 18 month old neutered male terrier mix. A small dog, Puppy is extremely friendly and sociable.

 

Oreo is a beautiful neuter male cat who is seven years old. Oreo is very friendly who wants nothing more than to be held and petted by his humans.

 

Mommy is a four year old spayed female cat. She is quite shy and nervous but quite sweet once you get to know her.

 

Sammy is an eleven year old neuter male cat. Sammy is very sweet, but does have some medical issues; however, those are currently well under control. If you are interested in adopting Sammy, our doctors will discuss his medical history in depth with you and his likely future needs.

 

Thank you for checking out these pets, and if you are interested and would like to meet any of them please feel free to call us on 702 645 0331. Please share by clicking on the buttons below!

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Feb 4, 2015 0 2473 Views

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For Adoption: Three Kittens!

 

We have three kittens ready for adoption either singly or together.

 

Cute…

…Cuter…

…Cutest!

All three are male and three months old. They have been examined at Craig Road Animal Hospital and vaccinated. If you are interested in adopting them please contact us on 702 645 0331.

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Sep 11, 2014 0 2163 Views

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For Adoption: “Opal”

For Adoption: “Opal”

UPDATE: Opal has been adopted and is now named Draco!

 

“Opal” is a six week old male Siamese mixed kitten that we have available for adoption.

He has received his first shots, has been dewormed, and has been found to be healthy by our doctors.

Opal was named by the staff after he was brought to our facility. He and his litter mate were strays who were attacked by a dog, and brought to our facility by a good Samaritan. Unfortunately, Opal’s litter mate was killed; however Opel was unharmed but obviously in need of a home.

If you are interested in adopting Opal please contact Craig Road Animal Hospital on 702 645 0331.

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Aug 4, 2014 0 5418 Views

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Renovations at Craig Road – Boarding, grooming, and more.

Craig Road Animal Hospital in North West Las Vegas, recently completed a number of renovations to improve services and patient care – particularly in the areas of boarding and grooming. Hospital Administrator Mike Falconer goes over these and what they mean for Craig Road Animal Hospital.

Mike Falconer, Hospital Administrator

By Mike Falconer

We are all very proud of what we do, and how we do it, here at Craig Road Animal Hospital. There are times, however, when we realize that there are things we could be doing better. Ultimately, that is what leads to new services and building projects like the one we have recently completed.

Ever since I started at Craig Road Animal Hospital we have brain storming about what we could use the large open area that was the hospital’s lobby before our expansion in 2008, an area we generically call the Sun Room.  We have kept a small amount of boarding pets in there but in general it has been used as a multipurpose space. We have used it for unpacking large shipments of supplies, our annual Santa photographs, receiving tours, staff education – you name it. However, we have always felt that we could do more with the space.

Grooming

Becky has been grooming at Craig Road Animal Hospital since it opened and the space that she works in has not really changed in all that time. We need to improve her area and with the addition of Lynee as a groomer who also works with large dogs it became even more obvious that we needed to upgrade our grooming facilities.

We have cordoned off a space in the Sun Room specifically for grooming, complete with two new tubs, one of small dogs, and another for the very largest dogs.

Our two new grooming tubs in our new grooming area.

The space also has a lot more natural light, better drying facilities, and a larger work area. It is also enclosed with glass and waterproof cladding stopping the spread of pet hair to the rest of the hospital.

Our new grooming area.

Cat Suites

By moving our grooming area into the sun room we were able to free up an entire room where grooming used to be. We have dedicated this new room in improving the quality of our cat boarding by adding 12 cat suites.

Our new Cat Suites can be linked together to provide a large controlled area for cats to explore but still keep them safe.

Each suite, or condo, feature two smaller rooms suitable for sleeping, or just hiding out, and a larger main room with a perch. Each suite can be connected to up to three others allowing owners of multiple cats (or owners who just want a lot of space for their cat) to book a large, enclosed environment that they can explore while still being safe and contained.

A single cat condo consisted of two small rooms and a larger room with a perch.

The cat suite room is a cat only space, and is very quiet to make things as comfortable as possible for our feline friends.

Dog Suites

Craig Road Animal Hospital has had large 6’ x 7’ dog suites for many years. We have now tiled each suite to make a warmer and more pet friendly space for the large dog, or multi-dog, households that make use of the suites.  Not only does this look a lot nicer of an environment for our bigger boarders – it makes it easier for our kennel staff to keep clean.

One of our Dog Suites, for large dogs, or for multi-dog house holds.

Sound Proofing

Our exam rooms are directly next to the Sun Room and this has meant that the occasional noise from this boarding area can be overheard and often at the most inconvenient times.

The wall between “the sun room” and our exam rooms ready for our new sound proofing to be installed. Note the additional double door frame.

We have added a significant amount of additional sound proofing between the sun room and exam rooms to combat this problem and I am pleased to report that it has been a great success. This is particularly great news as it allows us to look at adding some additional boarding into the sun room in the New Year.

All of these renovations, rather than adding new services, are about improving the environment and the quality of what we already do. As always, you are welcome to have a tour of our entire facility (or just see our recent renovations), please just ask any member of staff and they will arrange it for you and we also welcome tours by groups. Please feel free contact me directly to schedule a group tour.

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Dec 4, 2013 0 6267 Views

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The Paperwork of Travelling with your Pet

Craig road Animal Hospital’s own Dr. Jessica Hagstette discusses the research and paperwork required when leaving Las Vegas with you pet, or taking you pet to Las Vegas from a state other than Nevada or another country. 

Dr. Jessica Hagstette

by Jessica Hagstette, DVM

Traveling with your pet can be a stressful experience for both pet owner and pet. However, it can also mean a significant amount of paperwork for you and potentially testing, vaccinations, and treatments for your pet.

Regulations vary widely between states and even more widely between countries. Additionally, airlines themselves can also have their own rules and certain airports can also have their own restrictions.

Your veterinarian can help with some of this process, however, it does not replace your own research as to what you will need for your trip and your pets paperwork.

General Travel

For most intra-state travel in the contiguous United States a domestic Health Certificate is required. This is a legal document that a veterinarian has examined your pet within 10 days of travel and gives the status of your pet’s vaccinations. A health certificate is usually required by an airline for travel, but may also be asked for at state border crossings.

Certain states, Hawaii for example, have very strict rules about the importing of pets that are more akin to international travel. Checking with your local United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) office will give you some guidance as to any restrictions or issues.  A list of offices can be found here: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/area_offices/

Health Certificates need to be issued within 10 days before travel and are then valid for the next 30 days following the travel date. If your travels are to last longer than 30 days you will probably have to find a local veterinarian to issue a new health certificate for your return journey.

Please note that because health certificates are a legal document that states a Licensed Veterinarian has examined your pet on a particular date, the pet will have to be examined on that date of issue – even if your pet received an examination the previous day.

If your pet is not Microchipped we would strongly recommend having this done before any travel. Depending on your destination you  may have no choice but to microchip your pet, but it could also save your pet’s life should they become separated from you during your travels.

Checklist:

Health Certificate

Vaccination records

 Medical Records

 Microchip

Check with local and destination USDA Office

Air Travel

The most important thing about air travel and your pet is to talk to your airline. Each Airline will have their own rules about what documentation they will need and what accommodations will be needed for your pet.

Most airlines will require a Health Certificate and some may also require a “Letter of Acclimation.”

This is simply a letter from a veterinarian stating what temperatures it is OK for your pet to travel in (whether the issue is heat or cold).

Additionally, airports themselves may have their own restrictions so it is important to check with them also.

Finally, not all pets should fly. There are various medical conditions that would preclude your pet from stressful travel. Talk with your veterinarian before a long journey about medications and the general health of your pet.

Checklist:        

Health Certificate

Vaccination records

Medical Records

Microchip

Check with Airline (s)

Check with Airport (s)

Check with veterinarian

International Travel (Export)

Simply put, every country is different and the responsibility for ensuring that your pet does not end up in quarantine, because of a paperwork issue or a lack of a test or vaccine, is yours.

Thankfully the USDA has a great website with a lot of the forms and contact information you will need:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/pet_travel/pet_travel.shtml

You will also need to talk with the consulate of your destination country. Luckily, the State Department has a list of consular offices on their website:

http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/fco/

Please note that everything that applies for air travel will also apply to international travel with the added complexity of dealing with a foreign government. Additionally, some international health certificates will need to be endorsed by the local USDA office which may be in a different state.

Checklist:  

Health Certificate

Vaccination records

Medical Records

Microchip

Check with Airline (s)

Check with Airport (s)

Check with veterinarian

Check USDA website

Check with local USDA Office

Check with consulate

International Travel (Import)

The rules for bring a pet into the United States, in general an unexpired health certificate from the country of export will be all that is required for entry. However, local conditions may change that. The Centers for Disease Control  (CDC) can give more information on that and any restrictions that may be in effect.

http://www.cdc.gov/animalimportation/BringingAnimalToUs.html

The USDA has some general information on importing on their website here:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_import/animal_imports_pets.shtml

As with exporting, make sure to communicate with your airline and the airports to ensure the process is a smooth as possible.

Checklist:          

Health Certificate

Vaccination records

Medical Records

Microchip

Check with Airline (s)

Check with Airport (s)

Check with veterinarian

Check USDA website

Check with local USDA Office

Check CDC Website

The golden rule for international travel (and Hawaii) with your pet is that you cannot start too early.

The process can be expensive (testing, fees and visits), can take months, and the only guarantee is researching the required paperwork as much as possible. Your veterinarian is there to help you and to make the process is as smooth as possible.

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Nov 20, 2013 2 14853 Views

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Expanded Grooming Hours and Services

Craig Road Animal Hospital is proud to announce the expansion of our grooming hours and services with the addition of groomer Lynee Johnson to our team.

Lynee Johnson

Lynee hails from Michigan, has been grooming for 18 years, and she is a former Grooming Academy trainer.

Lynee will groom dogs of all sizes and cats and she will be grooming in the evenings during the week and during the day on the weekends. This means that Craig Road Animal Hospital now offers grooming services seven days a week.

We are currently accepting appointments for Lynee for the week beginning 10/21/13. Lynee will be working alongside Becky King who has been grooming at Craig Road since 1996.

All of the doctors and staff at Craig Road would like to welcome Lynee to our team.

If you would like to make an appointment with either of our groomers please just give us a call on (702) 645-0331. Please note that core vaccines and intestinal parasite testing is required to be up to date for all grooming patients .

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Oct 16, 2013 0 8338 Views

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The Threat of Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease has been found in all 50 states, and although not in epidemic proportions as in the South of the country, it is increasingly something that pet owners should be aware of – even in Las Vegas! Craig Road Animal Hospital’s own Dr. Beyers goes over the symptoms, preventatives, and cures for this potentially fatal disease. 

Dr. Beyers

By Seth Beyers, DVM

Heartworm disease may not be as well known in the Las Vegas area as some other parts of the country, but the threat of heartworm disease is out there!

This dangerous disease occurs when your pet is bitten by a mosquito.

Infected mosquitoes carry microscopic heartworm larvae which is deposited onto your pet and works its way into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, these worms migrate to the heart where they can grow up to 12 inches long! The heart may become so infected with worms that your pet may develop heart failure and/or lung disease. Heartworms may cause your dog to show symptoms such as a persistent cough, reluctance to exercise, and weight loss. When a large number of heartworms develop, it can lead to an abrupt obstruction of blood flow through the heart and lungs.

It is a very simple to test for heartworm disease. A small amount of blood is sent to the laboratory, and the results are back within days.

This test cannot consistently detect infection until heartworms are at least 7 months old. This is why it is important to test your pets every 6-12 months. Notify your veterinarian if there is any lapse in monthly treatment so appropriate testing can be scheduled.

Prevention of this heartworm disease is easy. A pill or chew ball medication is given every 30 days year-round. These medications are highly effective, safe, relatively inexpensive, and often will provide treatment of additional parasites. Prevention is always safer and more affordable than treating dogs with heartworm infection. Treating heartworm disease can be very costly and time consuming. There is risk of sudden death during treatment due to dislodgment of dead heartworms that may cause an embolism.

So at your next visit to Craig Road Animal Hospital be sure to discuss the individual risk factors, clinical signs, preventative changes, and testing limitations of heartworms disease with your veterinarian.

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Oct 15, 2013 2 8628 Views

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Pets in Transit

Craig Road Animal Hospital is proud to announce a new pet transportation service. Our team will provide non-emergency transport for pets throughout Southern Nevada. Pets in Transit was created with both pets and pet owners in mind to provide convenient, compassionate care at home, and for the transport for pets, pet supplies, and medications.

Because pets are our primary concern, Craig Road Animal Hospital provides an affordable, reliable caring solution for pet transport needs. Whether it’s for a regular check-up at Craig Road or a medical transfer from Craig Road to a specialty hospital, Craig Road’s Pets in Transit service can take the stress out of transporting pets for owners.

“We are very excited to be able to offer these services,” said Dr. Mychajlonka of Craig Road Animal Hospital. “We have built Craig Road around customer service, medical excellence, and giving our clients and patients what they want. Pets in transit is a natural extension of this and allows us to offer our patients an exciting level of care.”

Transport services start at $10.00 and are available during daylight hours subject to availability.

Craig Road Animal Hospital is an 11,000 square foot veterinary hospital in Northwest Las Vegas providing a wide range of veterinary services including preventative care, surgery, dental care including root canals, ultrasound, Laparoscopic surgery, Endoscopy, breeding consultations, grooming, boarding and indoor pet exercise.

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Oct 3, 2013 2 6621 Views

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Low Cost Spay & Neuter Special

Craig Road Animal Hospital’s Hospital Administrator Mike Falconer introduces the Las Vegas animal hospital’s low cost spay and neuter special pricing, along with some thoughts on why you’d want to be your pet “fixed”!

Mike Falconer, Hospital Administrator

There are both medical and behavioral reasons to have your dog or cat spayed or neutered.

Spayed and neutered pets are less apt to roam; decreasing the risk fights or traumas such as being hit by a car. Cats that are spayed and neutered are also less prone to urine marking behavior.

Spaying a female dog or cat decreases the risk of breast cancer, especially if done before the first heat cycle. Other health benefits of spaying include avoiding uterine cancer, and preventing a life-threatening infection called pyometra.

Neutering male dogs has the benefit of eliminating testicular cancer, reducing prostatic disease, decreasing aggression, as well as decreasing behavior problems such as urine marking and roaming.

Please note our new low cost spay and neuter prices:

Check out our low cost spay and neuter prices:

Cat spay and neuter

Cat Neuter          $35.00

Cat Spay               $65.00

Dog Neuter

Dog Neuter under 25lbs      $65.00

Dog Neuter 25 – 40 lbs            $75.00

Dog Neuter 41 – 60lbs           90.00

Dog Neuter Over 61lbs          105.00

Dog Spay

Dog Spay under 25lbs     $85.00

Dog Spay 25 – 40lbs         $100.00

Dog Spay 41 – 70lbs         $105.00

Dog Spay Over 70lbs       $120.00

Pricing includes pre-anesthetic exam, IV catheter, and anesthetic monitoring. Post operative pain meds, e-collar and sales tax are an additional cost that will vary depending on your pet. A full estimate will be presented upon check-in or you may come in with your pet to receive one. Not valid with any other specials or coupons.

Diagnostic bloodwork is an additional additional fee and may be mandatory depending ion the age of your pet.

Please note there are various options when spaying and neutering your pet. Please call to speak to a member of our veterinary team to discuss your pet’s individualized needs. Additional costs may apply for pets in heat, pregnant, or other health concerns such as age, weight and disease history.

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Aug 5, 2013 0 26377 Views

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What to Know About Neutering…

Getting your pet neutered can be a daunting prospect. Dr. Mychajlonka, also known as Dr. Mych – a veterinarian at Las Vegas’s own Craig Road Animal Hospital, in a follow up to his previous post on spaying your pet, discusses what the various terms and options mean, what the impact on cost these options can have, and how to choose what is best for your pet.

Dr. Mychajlonka

By Kurt Mychajlonka, DVM

Male cats and dogs should have their reproductive abilities removed if they are not going to be bred. The correct term for this is neutering. Neutering, like spaying in female pets, can have significant health and behavioral benefits in addition to also helping to prevent the unexpected arrival of kittens, or puppies, which can add to the homeless pet problem.

For most neuters, the procedure consists of removing the testicles from the scrotum. In cats, this is particularly simple which is why cat neuters tend to be lower in price than cat spays or dog neuters.

Dr. Mych performing a laproscopic proceedure.

Cryptorchid

There is a condition called Cryptorchid which can complicate neutering a pet. Cryptorchid is a congenital defect that means that one or both of the testacies has not descended into the scrotum. This can complicate the neutering surgery and can have health implications for the pet if the pet is not neutered. Testicles can become cancerous if they are exposed to the constant additional heat inside the body. Therefore, even though cryptorchid procedures can be more expensive, it is important to go ahead with the procedure for the long term health of your dog or cat.

With some cryptorchid dogs and cats, the testicle(s) have descended most of the way and have “got stuck” in the inguinal canal. Each case is different, but usually with one or two testicles stuck in the inguinal canal the veterinary surgeon can remove them in a similar manner to a conventional neuter. This may take slightly longer so most veterinarians do charge an additional fee.

However, with some cryptorchid pets the un-descended testicle(s) are in the abdomen. Traditionally, this has meant a long, complicated, and expensive exploratory surgery, with a large incision, and with the veterinarian looking throughout the abdomen for the rouge testicle. With laparoscopy there is an alternative. The procedure is similar to a lap spay, with the veterinary surgeon making two mini incisions and then using a video camera to look for the testicle in the abdomen. Because of the smaller incisions associated with laparoscopic procedures there is less post operative pain than with an exploratory which requires a large incision the length of the abdomen. This in turn leads to a faster recovery time. There is also less need for restricting activities. Because of the additional equipment and people required for a laparoscopic procedure, they tend to be more expensive than lower cost options; however, with cryptorchid procedures they can actually be lower in price due to better visualization and not having to close a very large incision.

There are, of course, other things to think about when neutering your pet – regardless of whether your dog or cat is cryptorchid or not. Most veterinary practices will offer different options, some of which will be included and some which are not, and therefore it is important when making comparisons to make sure you are complaining like for like. All anesthetic procedures have some inherent risk – most of the items below are about minimizing these risks.

Preoperative Blood Work

Just like with humans, blood tests are a great way of giving a general snapshot of the health of your dog or cat before any procedure. This becomes particularly important when your pet is over five years of age as that is when problems with the liver and kidneys can appear but have no external symptoms. Liver and kidney function are important because those organs metabolize the anesthesia used in most procedures for dogs and cats. In order to keep a low cost option for owners we offer preoperative blood work as an optional extra depending on the age and medical history of your pet.

 I.V. Catheter

An intravenous catheter allows fluids to given to a patient during the procedure – keeping their blood pressure up and keeping the patient hydrated. Additionally, an I.V. Catheter gives the doctor direct access to a vein to give an intravenous injection in an emergency. At Craig Road Animal Hospital we feel that this is so important that we do not have an I.V. Catheter as an optional extra but included in the price of every surgery – including low cost spays and neuters.

Pain Control

Injections and tablets to go home, after a neuter, are all about controlling the amount of discomfort your pet experiences post-op (after the operation). Even with laparoscopic procedures there is a certain amount of post operative discomfort so some kind of control is always recommended. At Craig Road, we do not feel that pain control is optional and so it is included in the cost of neutering.

Micro Chipping

A pet microchip is a small device that is implanted under the skin that is embedded with a unique number. When this number is registered with your contact information it provides an easy way for veterinarians and rescue organizations to reunite lost dogs and cats with their owners. Microchips can be implanted while your pet is awake with just a small amount of discomfort; however, when your pet is being spayed or neutered is a great time to do it as your pet will feel nothing.

For many people spaying or neuter their pet is the first veterinary surgical procedure they have ever been involved with, if indeed not the first surgical procedure period! It can be confusing and scary – our job is to answer your questions and give you all the information to make an informed choice about what is right for you and your pet. If you are concerned that your pet might be cryptorchid, or if you have any other questions about spaying or neutering your dog or cat please feel free to ask any of our staff next time you are at Craig Road Animal Hospital, give us a call or email, or post in the comments below.

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Jul 5, 2013 2 4430 Views

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What to Know About Spaying…

Getting your pet spayed can be a daunting prospect.  Dr. Mychajlonka, also known as Dr. Mych – a veterinarian at Las Vegas’s own Craig Road Animal Hospital, discusses what the various terms and options mean, what the impact on cost these options can have, and how to choose what is best for your pet.

Dr. Mychajlonka

By Kurt Mychajlonka, DVM

Female cats and dogs should have their reproductive abilities removed if they are not going to be bred. The correct term for this is spaying. Spaying can have significant health benefits for your pet in addition to also preventing the unexpected arrival of kittens, or puppies, which can add to the homeless pet problem.

There are effectively two types of spaying: traditional and laparoscopic.

With a traditional spay the uterus and the ovaries are removed through an incision in the abdomen. Because of the size of the incision, this is a great time to repair an umbilical hernia if your dog or cat has one. An umbilical hernia is a small lump of fatty tissue where the umbilical cord attached to the pet in the womb.

With a laparoscopic spay, sometimes known as a lap spay, only the ovaries are removed and the procedure only requires two mini incisions. The smaller incisions associated with a lap spay cause less post operative pain than with a traditional spay and that leads to a faster recovery time. There is also less need for restricting activities which makes lap spaying great for very active dogs. Because of the additional equipment and people required for a laparoscopic procedure, lap spays tend to be more expensive than lower cost options. At Craig Road Animal Hospital we try to keep the procedure competitively low cost for a spay as possible.

Dr. Mychajlonka performing a Lap Spay.

Of course, whether for traditional spaying or for a lap spay, Craig Road will be only too happy to see you and your pet. In addition to the choice between traditional spaying and laparoscopic spaying there are other options that most veterinary practices will offer and need to be thought about. All anesthetic procedures have some inherent risk – most of the items below are about minimizing these risks.

Preoperative Blood Work

Just like with humans, blood tests are a great way of giving a general snapshot of the health of your dog or cat before any procedure. This becomes particularly important when your pet is over five years of age as that is when problems with the liver and kidneys can appear but have no external symptoms. Liver and kidney function are important because those organs metabolize the anesthesia used in most procedures for dogs and cats. In order to keep a low cost option for owners we offer preoperative blood work as an optional extra depending on the age and medical history of your pet.

 I.V. Catheter

An intravenous catheter allows fluids to given to a patient during the procedure – keeping their blood pressure up and keeping the patient hydrated. Additionally, an I.V. Catheter gives the doctor direct access to a vein to give an intravenous injection in an emergency.  At Craig Road Animal Hospital we feel that this is so important that we do not have an I.V. Catheter as an optional extra but included in the price of every surgery – including low cost spays and neuters.

Pain Control

Injections and tablets to go home, after a spay, are all about controlling the amount of discomfort your pet experiences post-op (after the operation). Even with laparoscopic procedures there is a certain amount of post operative discomfort so some kind of control is always recommended.  At Craig Road, we do not feel that pain control is optional and so it is included in the cost of both traditional and lap spays.

Micro Chipping

A pet microchip is a small device that is implanted under the skin that is embedded with a unique number. When this number is registered with your contact information it provides an easy way for veterinarians and rescue organizations to reunite lost dogs and cats with their owners.  Microchips can be implanted while your pet is awake with just a small amount of discomfort; however, when your pet is being spayed or neutered is a great time to do it as your pet will feel nothing.

For many people spaying their pet is the first veterinary surgical procedure they have ever been involved with, if indeed not the first surgical procedure period! It can be confusing and scary – our job is to answer your questions and give you all the information to make an informed choice about what is right for you and your pet; whether that be a traditional spay vs. a lap spay, pre-operative blood work, I.V. cathers, pain medications and / or pain control.

Please feel free to ask any of our staff next time you are at Craig Road Animal Hospital, give us a call or email, or post in the comments below.

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Jun 3, 2013 0 30887 Views

phone: 702.645.0331 | fax: 702.645.5009 |
5051 W. Craig Road Las Vegas, NV 89130
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